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. it was edward cooley green over six-foot tall and 200 pounds and a self-made millionaire he asked hetty to mary ann and her father agreed on one condition. that edward signed a prenuptial that they would live off of edwards monday and hetty money was hers to protect and increase and pass on to the next generation. shortly after that her father died and left her $1 million. the $5 million estate, in 1865, was plucked in a trust. that hurt her deeply. she wanted to control her own money. then her aunt died. and then she would leave all of the many of $2 million to hetty behalf was left to the town of new bedford and the other half to hetty and it was plucked in trust. she was furious so she sued. the lawsuit went on for years and was a landmark case and hetty was litigious for life. surely after her and edward married and went to london and sold american railroad bond during the days of the boom and he sold them to european investors. hetty gave birth to two children. a son and daughter and she invested her money in the real road bond and the greenback. and boasted in one day she made $200,000 eu
, is distinguished fellow and conservative thought, the be simon center for principals and politics. dr. edwards has enjoyed a career as one of the leading historian of american conservatism. his works range from biographies of president reagan to a recent biography of william f. buckley. dr. edwards is founding director of the institute of political journalism at georgetown and was a fellow at the institute of politics at jfk school of government at harvard. john lewis gaddis next to me is one of the leading historians of the cold war. he won the pulitzer prize for his biography of the diplomats george f. cats. john lewis gaddis's work as robert lovett prof. of history and influenced the work of cold war historians all over the world. played a major role on uncovering the role of leadership personalities, the influence of his work can be seen in the 24 part cnn television series cold war. a graduate of universal -- yale university, class of, can you help me, i was missing that detail. mr. evans, his book blacklisted by history the untold story of senator joe mccarthy and his fight against america's
. [laughter] i didn't ask them to ask this question. >> his name is lee -- >> lee edwards. >> lee edwards. >> that's right. >> who is also a biographer, as you are. >> and he's a historian. he's written several histories of the conservative movement. he himself has been a member of the conservative movement, an important person in that. >> jealousy? >> no, it's not jealousy, i can do that. but one thing about mr. edwards being asked to write that review, is that one of the things he takes issue with is i call him from his ghost writer because -- it was thurmond's staffer, former staffer of thurmond who has characterized his work on the book as being ghost writing. i talked to them and after talking to him, i e-mailed mr. edwards and i asked him if i could interview him about his relationship with traffic and what work he did in that kind of thing. and he said it was 40 years ago, yeah, as any entity would be a waste of your time and mine. so my own thing i can do, he was brave enough to read a criticism after the book when it got right. he got a number of things wrong. he quoted goldwater
this cost $142 billion. fannie and freddie were under the thumb of their regulator, edward demarco, a no-nonsense fellow who promise to shrink gradually and reduce the independence of the housing market gradually. meanwhile we are still relying on fannie and freddie to provide funding for most mortgages. annie, freddie and the f h a have accounted for 90% of u.s. home loans. eventually congress will make a fundamental decision about what kind of mortgage market we will have. it will go back to trusting the free market or have some kind of government mechanism in place to insure that home mortgages can always be affordable? i submit that the historical record of the past 70 years suggests when a comes to housing congress will have a hard time trusting the market. thank you. [applause] >> great comments. this brings us to our discussions of whom the first will be tom who has been in the mortgage research business for 35 years, a longstanding critic of government sponsored enterprise and has great perspective on the fateful history which bob has so well chronicled. he held with morgan guara
youngest child prince edward. she has opinions which she will express and private, but extremely careful to not make political statements in public. i was told about one that was amusing that robert title one of the american ambassador's during george of the bush came for the presentation of his credentials and then there was the congestion tax that was a political hot potato and being imposed to keep them from driving into london the american embassy maintained there were not liable to pay because they said it was a charge but they call it the tax. robert tuttle arrived for his credentials they went through the formalities then the informal discussion and she said, and stand you think the congestion charge is the tax? she said it is and she said of course, it is. the diplomatic corps turned white at the prospect but that is very unusual. with her relationship with american presidents, she bonded with them on a personal basis but nothing to do with politics. >>host: with several instances you indicated she has a wicked sense of humor. >>guest: she does. she spends a lot of time in scotla
. the letter to edward conway started on he wants to bring in german immigrants to be in ventured servants, and incur -- intermingle with the slaves. he said their children will be free. i don't interpret that as him kind of being racist saying slaves can become citizens but in ventured servants can. are you suggesting that he was imagining them to intermingling intermarriage and that he -- >> no. no. go ahead. spent the letter pretty clearly refers to the german children that he's talking about -- >> there's a follow-up -- >> i've read -- i know in 1798 short makes almost the same proposal and short explicitly calls for interracial marriage and interracial children. he embraced it spent totally different circumstances. >> it's the same type of proposal. he was talking about german immigrants. the same type of thing, but i mean in jefferson's letter, i mean, i've written about it. i'd be happy to show you the letters. in this letter, he's talking about the children, the germans. >> no. now, he's talking about the children's be dished i have a letter spent that's what he told thomas paine b
a lot of anti-president obama books like edwards kline "the amateur," "the great destroyer" "i am the change," and "obama's america," critical of president obama. do these books sell well? >> guest: they do sell well because they are rightly or wrongly a counter point. readers wish to buy that that, and as a result, these books have an an active audience. now that he's re-elected, i'm serve publishers who are conservatively inclined will continue to produce books that sell well because they will continue to appeal to an audience that demands these books. >> host: now, bob, have you interviewed any of the critical authors? >> guest: no -- well, let's see, glenn beck, but he's not recently taken on exactly president obama. sort of interesting. i think this is generally true, who whoever -- whoever is in the power in the white house, the opposite political slant on books does better. when a liberal democrat is in the white house, conservatives tend to do belter. when there's a conservative in the white house like bush, books critical of the president tend to do better. in fact, i rem
' day, february 8 team. the >> president john f. kennedy and senators robert f. kennedy and edward kennedy. the author examines joseph kennedy's careers in business and politics, which included ventures on wall street, hollywood and the founding chairman of the securities and exchange commission. this is a little under an hour. >> thank you all. as i tell my history students -- [inaudible] as i tell my histories of it until i went to choke me, the past is a foreign country. we can visit there, try to learn the customs, translate the language, feel the air, the fragrance, but where foreigners in a strange way. this is true as much of the recent past as it is of colonial america. writing about the recent past is not easy to tailor this time around. first, there were people got to talk to. i was blessed from beginning to end by having fascinating views. i much prefer working for but documents than listening to people, tried to figure out what's real, what's imagined, what they know, what they think they know because someone told them what they think they know, but they don't know at a
ds, put out a lot of anti president obama books including edward klein's "the amateur," david limbaugh's "the great destroyer," charles kessler's i am the change, obama's america, quite critical of president obama. do these books sell well? >> they do largely because they serve rightly or wrongly as a counterpoint. many readers wish to buy into at and as a result of these books have a very active audience and president obama has been reelected, i am sure these publishers with conservative inference or conservatively inclined will predict to sell well and they will continue to appeal to an audience that demand these books. >> have you interviewed these critical of others? >> no. let's see. glen beck, but he is not recently taken on exactly president obama. sort of interesting. this is generally true, whoever's in power in the white house, the opposite political slant does better. liberal democrat in the white house, when there's a conservative in the white house, president bush, critical of the president and do better. it was being questioned about jobs or something and he said
concerned. last time we had good candidates just in general with john edwards with it is called yes i know he is the millworkers son but there is hollywood and the hair. sarah palin. i wrote her version of the barbra streisand classic on the cleared day icy-- i can see russia. and talked-about candidates and seems impossible but the then governor of illinois was mentioned rob flood of which -- the ugly of block a and hit seem to to hem a powerful appointment to which the appointment should make you rich but the plant turned out to have a glitch perhaps the fed said flipped a switch and so much for rob blob of which. in 2012 was a little concerned wonder two candidates were left over to your fans including romney when i did a poem about him yes, he is so slick of speech and garb he reminds us of ken of ken and barbie. quick to shed his regalia he may be lacking genitalia. [laughter] one but we had good candidates for car was concerned there was only one primary in 2008 i had to. we had people like rick perry like john edwards has beautiful hair. and a good time because they say the neath th
were taken by the photographer, edward steichen, in 1903. he was just starting out as a photographer and morgan was sitting for a portrait--having his portrait painted. and he hated to sit still for very long, so alfred stieglitz, who was a very famous photographer, decided that morgan should have a photo--the painter should have a photograph to work from, and hired edward steichen, who was just starting out in his career, to do it. steichen came in--he actually posed a janitor in the shot while he set it up to get it ready for morgan. morgan blew in, sat down very quickly, took the pose that he always took for the portrait painter, and steichen made the quick exposure and took that shot. however, he didn't really like the pose. he thought it was too formal, too self-conscious, and he asked morgan to rearrange himself a little bit, to move his head slightly to one side and get in a more comfortable position. morgan was not pleased to be told to rearrange himself a little bit, so he bristled a bit. and steichen immediately saw that this was the morgan--he saw these sort of piercing ey
. kennedy and senators robert f. kennedy and edward kennedy. the author examines joseph kennedy's career in business and politics, which included ventures in wall street, hollywood and the founding chairman of the securities and exchange commission. this is a little under an hour. [applause] >> thank you, all. delighted to be here. as i tell my history students at the city university of new york in the ph.d. program -- thank you. [laughter] as i tell my history students until they want to choke me the past is a foreign country. we can visit, try to learn the customs and the white smith the fragrances, recoil at the foul odors but we are foreigners in a strange land. this is true as much in the recent past as it is of colonial america or 12th century venice. writing about the recent past is not easy as it is this time around. first there are people you have to talk to. and while i was blessed from beginning to end by having some fascinating people to talk to about joe kennedy including large numbers of committees, i much prefer working from written documents to listening to people talk an
influence in pluto accurates. in "the social conquest of earth," biologist edward o. wilson argues that group selection is the reason for human evolution. steve cole, president of the new america foundation, investigates the power and global influence of exxonmobil in "private empire: exxonmobil and american power." for an extended list of ligs to 2012 notable book selections, visit booktv's web site, booktv.org or our facebook page, facebook.com/booktv. >> booktv continues now with diana furchtgott-roth. she takes a look at president obama's green jobs initiative and argues that it hurts the economy. this is about 40 minutes. >> good afternoon. i'm howard, vice president for policy research at the manhattan institute. thanks so much for joining us. the question of of whether and how government, particularly the federal government, directs tax dollars to specific industries was a discussion in last night's presidential debate, and can it's become an important and ongoing theme in the current presidential campaign. the terms on which washington assisted the finance and auto industri
to ireland, jean kennedy smith, who was essential enraging piece. and senator edward kennedy, the longest-serving senator at his death in the united states senate. the story of joseph kennedy is the story of the man who spent his life moving back and forth from outsider to insider and back into outsider insider. story of an irish catholic who is not ashamed of his irish heritage, but refused to be defined by it. he was a third generation immigrant. his parents had been born in the united states. his grand parents had come here when they were young people. joseph kennedy cared little about the countries whose grandparents had been born in. he had no desire to visit ireland or read about it. he was 100% american. and he couldn't quite understand why anyone would think of him as less than 100% american. his anger was the catholic church growing up. being irish catholic in boston, he needed an anchor. he was born in east boston is kind of local royalty. everyone knew his mother's family and his father's family and his father was a well-known prominent awesome politician and very well respecte
and edward auto of ghana and president felix coetzee -- of the ivory coast and i just murdered their names for which i apologize. it included the sms or liberia samuel z westerfield as well as a reverent billy graham. and mrs. john h. johnson, the wife of the president of the johnson publishing company that published ebony and jet. in addition to speeches before political parties the africans treated past and her entourage to a whirlwind of dinners receptions and presentations. patzek or responsibilities seriously. julie noted in for her biography of her mother that pat snuck away from the family of two goodies to go over her written notes and organize her thoughts for the upcoming trip. the state department staff repaired remarks for her she went over them making changes where she felt necessary and highlighting point she wanted to emphasize. in liberia sheen -- by noticing how i'm -- noting noting our press she was by the considerable development that occurred since your last visit in 1957. in ghana she traveled out of the hills to pay her respects to 83-year-old chief who she met du
to venture out. he had this insatiable appetite for running. he studied david hume, the six volumes of edward gibbons decline and fall of the roman empire. adam smith's two volume work on the wealth of nations, the great economic work. he kept studying latin and read cicero. he read english poets. he had this insatiable appetite for learning. a 69 was still studying on goal wrigley. i went to jail instead of harvard. of course a big difference. >> but i take it as a politician especially in our modern sense of the word he may have lacked a certain common touch. >> he had no common touch but very few of the leaders in the country did at that time. they were all university graduates except for george washington, and george washington educated himself. he read more than 6,000 books. this was an elite. the constitution didn't give liberty of the ordinary man. turned over but it gave congress the same life the parliament had and they could tax us without our permission. it gave the constitution did not provide liberty for the american people. if the government into the hands of the property elite,
volumes of edward gibbons, decline and fall of the roman empire. adam smith's two volume work on the wealth of nations, great economic word. he kept studying latin. he read the latin poets in cicero and avenue. he read the english poet. he had this insatiable appetite for learning. at 16 i was still studying uncle wiggly. but i read it in latin because i went to heal instead of harvard. >> i take it as a politician in our modern sense of the word female black the common touch. >> very few of the leaders of this country did at the time. they were all university graduates except for george washington and george washington was an autodidact commotion so fed 6000 books. this was an elite. constitution did not give liberty to the ordinary man. all it did was replace the king with the president. but it gave congress the same right. congress could tax. the constitution did not provide liberty for the american people. if the government into the hands of a property elite and was a white male that ran this country for the first year of our nation. >> house on to put it to slavery come f
of the regulator, edward demarco, a no-nonsense fellow, and he promised to shrink them gradually and to reduce the independence of the housing market on them gradually. but meanwhile, we are still relying on fannie and freddie to provide funding for most home mortgages. fannie and freddie and fha in recent years have accounted for around 90% of new u.s. homeland. eventually congress will have to make have to make fundamental decisions about what kind of mortgage market will we have. should we go back to trusting the free market, or shall we have some kind of government mechanism in place to ensure that to mortgages can always be a portable? i submit that the historical record of the past 70 years suggest that when it comes to housing, congress will have a hard time trusting the market. thank you. [applause] >> great comments. this brings us to our discussants. the first will be tom who has been in the mortgage research business for a mere 35 years. a long-standing critic in government sponsored enterprises and has great perspective on the fateful history which bob is so well chronicled. tom wa
to misbehavior in high office. there's a long history of it and arnold schwarzenegger and john edwards, david petraeus had nothing on alexander hamilton. if you read for example letters written by martha washington going to the winter camp, she didn't complain about the weather. she didn't complain about the harsh conditions but she did complain about one thing. there was a was a tomcat one winter that was misbehaving and it was noisy and kept her awake at night so she nicknamed the tomcat alexander hamilton. because of all the young girls will come into the camp. i also did a book a few years ago called life in the white house about the presidents and these. what hobbies do they have? what were their fears and hopes and what did they -- or were they like his fathers and husbands as another way of stressing presidential characters providing us with another lens. we are all still trying to figure out -- and for example nixon in his free time like to bowl alone and sometimes wore a black suit to do it. that begins to explain things, right everyone? who does this? so i guess all books and up to
appreciations of professor bickel who we've talked about and edward levy. >> guest: yeah, ed levy was the first professor i had in law school, and then he became dean of the law school, then he became provost and president of the university, and he became attorney general when i was solicitor general. so he was my first professor and my last attorney general. but i'll never forget the most vivid recollection i have of him is we came into class the first day and sat down, and he was looking at us waggling a big cigar and waggling his eyebrows, which he did. and finally, silence for a long time. and finally he said i'm not going to keep you long today. i'm not going to keep you long because i haven't got anything to say to you. i haven't got anything to say to you because you're too eager to talk to, and that made an impression on me. >> host: wow. judge bork, thank you so much. >> guest: well, i enjoyed chatting with you, gene. >> host: thank you. >> that was "after words," booktv's signature program in which authors of the latest nonfiction books are interviewed by journalists, public policymak
's answers left everyone shocked and unnerved. afterwards, attorney general edward bates setup into the night filling page after page of his diary. quote, the secretary of war and the president are kept in ignorance of the actual condition of the army and its intended movements bates confided. the blame he concluded lay with abraham lincoln. an excellent man wrote bates and in the main wise but he lacks will and purpose and i greatly fear he has not the power to command. over the next 12 months, the civil war became a cataclysm. the federal government became a -- in the confederacy came close to winning its independence. get set for the key losses that led to its doom. 186200 the death knell of slavery and the military leaders who would eventually win the war. like grant, sherman, sheridan, meredith. the future of the nation was set that year in indelible inc.. a blueprint for an america of continental red, network transportation, widespread education and industrial might. at the same time these 12 terrible months revealed the dreadful cost of entry into that future. payable in blood and mise
for being on booktv. >> from the fourth annual boston book festival, a panel featuring author edward glaeser. it's about an hour, 15. >> good afternoon and thank you very much for coming to this auditorium today. let me introduce myself, i'm bob oakes from morning edition on wbur, boston's npr news station. [applause] thank you. thank you. i'm sure some of you are saying, wow, that's bob oakes? [laughter] i thought he was taller -- [laughter] i thought he was thinner, i thought he had more hair. [laughter] and, you know, the funny thing is that all those things were true last week. [laughter] let me thank all of you for coming here this afternoon and thank the boston book festival for having us. don't they do a nice job? isn't this a terrific eventsome. >> yes. [applause] >> let's also thank the plymouth rock foundation for sponsoring this particular session and say that without their generosity, it would be hard to put on events like this that add to the cultural life that we all enjoy in this great city. so so thanks to them. [applause] and in a way that's what we're here to talk about thi
until i'm done. let me run through a few people. maryann hobberman, james carol, edward, victor, lily, jean valentine, robert cairo, and are also winners of the pulitzer prize. juneau diaz, katherine, and tracy smith, amanda foreman. national book critic circle wins nora and robert and dave eagers recipient of the literary award and stephen king. please join me in recognizing these great american writers. [applause] i would like to our financial supporters. without whom woe couldn't bring you awards the or programs. i would like you to hold your applause until i've read the list. premier sponsors barnes & noble, ban skies, random house, the ford foundation, leadership sponsors. harper colins, stephen king, debra buy lee, thank you. [applause] [applause] okay, now for something special. i'd like to acknowledge in the audience the winner of the fourth annual innovation in reading prize. funded by the lessening gear foundation. listen to the list and hold your applause until i'm finished. we have 15-year-old lily. she started givingly briers in a homeless shelter where kids can take as m
army. gunnery sergeant justin edward malti united states marine corps, pittsburgh. master sergeant benjamin franklin bitner, united states army green castle. first lieutenant demet r*u s, lancaster. staff sergeant david edward mills injury, united states army, new castle. sergeant joseph michael garrison, united states marine corps, new bethel. staff sergeant patrick ryan dulfa, united states marine corps, moscow. sergeant christopher matthew wrinkle, united states marine dallas town. petty officer michael joseph strange, united states navy, philadelphia. technical sergeant daniel lee sur, united states air force, york. staff sergeant eric scott holmen, united states army, everyone city. lieutenant colonel christopher keith rabel, united states marine corps, north huntington. chief petty officer, nicholas david czech, u.s. navy, monroeville. commander job w. price, u.s. navy, potts town. major wesley james hinckley, united states army, cumberland city. i yield back to the senior senator. mr. casey: mr. president? the presiding officer: the senior senator from pennsylvania. mr. case
Search Results 0 to 24 of about 25 (some duplicates have been removed)

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